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P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts

Infusing Education with the Creative

Weekly Art Walk with Artist-in-Residence Victoria Stanton

Jan 2018 to  25 May 2018,  
16:00 to 14:00 
P. Lantz Artist-in-Residence Victoria Stanton invites you for a silent art walk on the mountain. Beauty is right here in our backyard – and everywhere once we start to notice it. The Weekly Art Walk is a moment to reflect and recharge; to move and unwind. Come be enchanted by simplicity! Open to individual and group walks.
From the artist:
Sitting at the foot of Mount-Royal, the Faculty of Education overlooks the incredibly lush terrain of one of this city’s most important landmarks. The Weekly Walk takes advantage of this proximity, inviting students, faculty and staff to come join me every Friday to journey up the steps and onto the trails from 3 – 4pm. The Weekly Walk is a moment to reflect, recharge, or to reconnect (with oneself, with nature); to problem-solve, zone out or just get outside for an hour… It is generally a silent walk, but exceptions can be made to have a Walk & Talk if this is specially requested by a participant.
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The Mural Project: A Community Wall Drawing

Interested in working at a large scale?

Come and join a work group that will explore the materials and techniques of site-specific drawing.

 

Participants will work together, exploring:

  1. How to work with architectural parameters.
  2. Choosing the right materials.
  3. Developing a formal vocabulary.
  4. Drawing and painting on a large-scale.

 

Participants can join the group at any point.  The work will be done afternoons throughout the month of May.

[EVENT PAGE]

Organization: Artist-in-Residence
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2018 Weekly Indigenous Film Series

McGill’s Faculty of Education and The P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education and the Arts present the 2018 season of the Weekly Indigenous Film Series, facilitated by Lori Beavis and supported by McGill’s Department of Integrated Studies in Education and the Institute for Human Development and Well-Being (IHDW).

 

List of films:

Qallunaat! Why White People are Funny, Mark Sandiford  (2006)  

11 Jan. 2018 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

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“Experimental Eskimos” (2009, Greenwald & Arnaquq-Baril)

25 Jan. 2018 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

“Arctic Defenders” (2013, Walker/Arnaquq–Baril)

1 Feb2018 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

“Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” (2011, Alison Klayman)

8 Feb2018 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

Born into Brothels, 2004 (written & directed by Zana Briski &Ross Kauffman, 85 min)

15 Feb2018 – 16:00 to 18:00

 

 

 

 

The Silent Enemy (1928) Directed by H.P. Carver, Douglas Burden, Producer

15 March 2018 – 14:00 to 16:00

(Picture: Molly Nelson, Penobscot actress, dancer, writer, 1903-1977)

 

 

 

Birth of a Family (2016, Tasha Hubbard)

5 April 2018 – 14:00 to 16:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World (2017, Catherine Bainbridge, dir. / Alfonso Maiorana, co-dir.)

12 April 2018 – 14:00 to 16:00

 

 

 

 

McGill Art Hive Initiative (MAHI) Recycling Campaign

One of the great drivers of the Art Hives Movement is a commitment to the creative reuse of resources. The artistic potential of recycled materials was explored via a Recycled Art Workshop on Dec 6th in the Lobby of the Education Building. The workshop, facilitated by Lori Beavis (P. Lantz Initiative Coordinator), Maria Ezcurra (MAHI Art Facilitator), and Zeynab YousefZadeh, also marked the start of the MAHI’s recycling campaign for the coming year.

Special collection boxes have been placed at the 1st and 2nd floor entrances of the Faculty of Education, as well as at the entrance of the Art Hive itself in the Curriculum Resources Centre.

The MAHI encourages the McGill community to embrace this spirit of creative reuse and generously donate to the cause in the form of art and craft supplies (new or gently used) and reusable materials such as wood, paper, fabric etc. Help us make this initiative as sustainable as possible.

 

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Music in the Atrium: Students from Music Education Class work with Artists in Residence

Overview of the Project:
 
This was a Music-Education dual degree class. We went into the class on November 24th, 2017 and talked about “constructivist” approaches to art making, i.e. working with basic elements, and experimenting with spatial parameters. We gave them all a basic layout plan of the atrium space and asked them to come to our second meeting with instruments in hand. They were also meant to draw a “propositional sketch” which would outline an ensemble of 3-4 instruments within the space of the atrium. 
 
In the atrium, we did a number of warm up exercises in which they “attuned” their instruments and voices to the material conditions within the environment. We explored the properties of “rhythm” as a sonic texture ( musical consistency) rather than a strictly regulated meter. The students were asked to sound out for one another in the space, and to develop conversations within a musical environment that would allow for other conversations to enter. 
 
In the second part of the exercise, we took three different ensemble concepts,  and used them as a prompt for three different soundscapes.In between each ensemble, the group came together and discussed the previous exercise and made slight adjustments to our working methods. For example, we banned ourselves from the piano which we considered too much of a “compositional” (as opposed to constructivist) sound machine. We also limited ourselves from speaking to one another in the process. The last piece we did we moved into the stairwell and made the logic of walking up and down the stairs our central musical prompt. 
 
Our emphasis was on what Victoria and Aaron were thinking of as a dual opening – one towards the pre-existing musicality of the space, and one towards the potential musicality of others who might want to enter. This was a very special class – and the teacher Lisa Lorenzino, to her credit, really had the group primed for this kind of camaraderie. 
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SAMPLE X, The Way I Hear It! – Every Thursday, from Nov 8th to December 14th, 2017

The P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts

through its Visiting Artist-in-Residence Initiative, presents:

Every Thursday, from Nov 8th to December 14th, 11 am to 4 pm.

Entrance lobby (and some other spots), Faculty of Education, McGill University

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We are pleased to let you know that we are having a Visiting Artist-in-Residence in the Faculty of Education.

Jai Nitai Lotus will be setting up a portable music station every Thursday from 11 am to 4 pm, to create sample-based, Hip Hop music with an open invitation to students and faculty to participate in the process.

He is also open to come to anyone’s classes to speak about his project in connection to education and to the relevance it has in our current learning experiences.

For more info email: maria.ezcurralucotti@mcgill.ca or Jai Nitai LoTus jainitailotus@gmail.com

Jai Nitai Lotus is a multi-disciplinary Hip Hop artist, based out of Montreal. He has played the Montreal Jazz Festival twice with his 9-piece band, as well as numerous other national festivals (Manifesto, Harbor Front, NXNE). He has earned many accolades, such as winning a TIMA (Toronto Independent Music Award), being nominated for Best Rap Album at the Quebec Gamiq Awards and a Polaris Prize mention. He currently works as the Music Coordinator at NBS studio (a part of the Masion des Jeunes Cote-des-Neiges) recording, educating and mentoring youth through Hip Hop music.

Come join us in celebrating the arts and our great community of Education!

INVITATION: McGill Art Hive (MAHI) Launch, TUE NOV 28 5 pm

The Faculty of Education cordially invites you to experience the transformative power of shared creativity as we launch the new McGill Art Hive Initiative (MAHI) to the greater McGill community. This initiative is made possible through the generous support of the Rossy Family Foundation, and builds upon the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education in the Arts.

An Art Hive is based on the idea of an open studio space. It welcomes everyone as an artist, supporting them in the exploration of their creative capacity and aiming to build a stronger, more inclusive community through the process of art-making.

Come and spend some time in our newfound home learning more about what the Art Hive could mean for students, instructors and all the various student support units on campus; getting to know the artists-in-residence, and enjoying exhibitions and screenings.

 

Dr. Claudia Mitchell, Director of the IHDW

Dr. Maria Ezcurra, MAHI Art Facilitator

Ms. Sadaf Farookhi, MAHI Coordinator


Tuesday, November 28, 5-7 pm @ Education building, 3700 McTavish, 1st floor

[Click here or on the image to RSVP]

[event page]

Monthly Report About Nothing

From September 2017 through to May 2018, I will join the inimitable Vince Tinguely in a guest spot on his radio show, The Kitchen Bang Bang Law.

This monthly check-in, taking place the last Tuesday of each month on CKUT, 90.3 FM (McGill’s radio station), will be a time when Vince and I chat, interview-style, about my residency experience at McGill, reflecting on the developments and discoveries as they unfold over the year.

 

– Listen to Sept 26 archive here – (cue to 9:19 on the timeline)

 

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Weekly Walk

Sitting at the foot of Mount-Royal, the Faculty of Education overlooks the incredibly lush terrain of one of this city’s most important landmarks. The Weekly Walk takes advantage of this proximity, inviting students, faculty and staff to come join me at the corner of Peel and Doctor Penfield every Friday to journey up the steps and onto the trails from 3 – 4pm. The Weekly Walk is a moment to reflect, recharge, or to reconnect (with oneself, with nature); to problem-solve, zone out or just get outside for an hour… It is generally a silent walk, but exceptions can be made to have a Walk & Talk if this is specially requested by a participant.
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Resting, Walking, Place-Making: Blog

In May 2016, I embarked on a quest: I decided to make work about nothing. More precisely, I wanted to see if I could undertake to Do Nothing as an art project. But as soon as I began, I was immediately beleaguered by the question: What does that even mean? This question lead me on a yearlong journey which wrapped up its first cycle the following spring.

Recognizing a need to continue this line of inquiry around the complex quest to Do Nothing (and deciding, finally, to this on as a lifelong preoccupation), I thought it could be relevant to look back to previous projects, to see how work from my past was actually paving the way for this current endeavour to come into being.

The result is a second cycle of the Doing Nothing project, expanded to include other processes that have informed my art-making, and, in my perception, encapsulate what I think of as The Invisible, Liminal Spaces in Art.

This next foray into Nothing happily found another home: The P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts Artists in Residence program at McGill University (in the Faculty of Education).

Resting, Walking, Place-Making, therefore identifies three major components that, whether taken on their own terms or seen as intermingling within a single trajectory, each underscore the implicit mandate of revealing the more invisible aspects of artistic process.

Resting
emerges as the continuation of the yearlong project The Sanctimonious Sect of Nothing Is Sacred. Collectively enacted moments of downtime in a variety of public locations in Montreal were carried out alongside a program of curated dialogues (Talking About Nothing With…), both of which generated extensive discussions around the complexity of this quest. A general consensus repeatedly rose to the surface: that there is a need to carve out such spaces (and times) for deep pause within our personal lives and within our professional sectors – albeit that this is a very difficult thing to actually (or consistently) do. Sitting with the intricacies of these questions affirmed that (non)activity is an inherently political act: one that challenges notions of productivity, of what constitutes “failure” (and success) and our capacity to comfortably engage in “non-productive” uses of time.

Place-Making
issues forth from a series of residencies in Quebec and beyond in which geopoetic meanderings and one-on-one interactions considered such questions as: What consciousness do we bring to places we occupy? How do places inhabit us? How do we interact with the surrounding environment – and with others who we may encounter there? In a mindful habitation of successive sites, I undertook several accompanied trajectories; transactions that consciously situated themselves in relation to both “the other” (as we each become the other to one (an)other) and to the context in which we found ourselves. Unpacking the process of how we come to understand a place – and the conditions required to feel some sense of “belonging” – this was an inquiry into how “place” is indeed constructed. The goal was to activate these sites by introducing a performative element via a relational exchange – collaboratively working toward expanding a moment in time while collapsing an already diminishing space between the artist/audience and art/life. The art frame (while more-or-less imperceptible) provided an invaluable context and container within which to carry out this research – a rather delicate form of personalized social engagement.

Walking
is the inexorable by-product of both of the above. As a conscious act within these varied projects, walking has occupied the role of an embodied encounter with the surrounding environment: at once a means to get from point A to point B, while also creating connection to (and understanding of) “place,” through subtly integrating aspects of the particularity of “places” in a circularity of identity construction (place informs who I am; I imprint my identity onto a place). Walking is also, however, the most banal of pursuits, a “non-action” sitting at the threshold of liminal space as it exists as a largely invisible activity. Walking is slow, inefficient, unproductive. Rebecca Solnit writes: “[T]hinking is generally thought of as doing nothing in a production-oriented culture, and doing nothing is hard to do. It’s best done by disguising it as doing something, and the something closest to doing nothing is walking.” This succinct correlation accurately highlights the role of walking not only in my most recent research but also as a process that has become an increasingly central element of my post-studio art practice.

…Bringing the foundations of these lines of inquiry to the Artist in Residency program, my desire is to continue exploring these themes within a collective framework. To examine the roles of rest (slowness, stillness, spaces of pause and interval), connection to place (the way we invest of ourselves in the environments that frame our day-to-day activities both professionally and personally) and walking (an everyday activity that at once serves a practical function but also allows for freedom and fluidity of thought), as parallel forms of creative and intellectual expression that can enhance pedagogical methods while providing valuable tools for social engagement and change.

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Art-Mediator

Maria Ezcurra

Art-Mediator, 2016-2017
Faculty of Education, McGill University

Contact: maria.ezcurralucotti@mcgill.ca

 

As an Art-Mediator at McGill’s Faculty of Education, Maria Ezcurra has worked to facilitate dialogue and the exchange of knowledge through the arts. Supported the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts, she has been constantly promoting a participative approach to art as pedagogical strategy. Mediating between art and education, her work is to engage students, faculty and staff in diverse creative projects.

Among other initiatives, Maria has planned and facilitated several workshops and art events with the community of Education; she has supported the Artists-in-Residence to develop their art projects, including the permanence of the McGill Art Hive (started by her in 2015); she has coordinated DISE’s Visiting Artists Series, and organized McGill Faculty of Education’s Altar for the Day of the Dead, to honour the lives of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Children in Canada, in collaboration with Lori Beavis (AiR).

MAHI

INVITATION: McGill Art Hive (MAHI) Launch, TUE NOV 28 5 pm

 

The Faculty of Education cordially invites you to experience the transformative power of shared creativity as we launch the new McGill Art Hive Initiative (MAHI) to the greater McGill community. This initiative is made possible through the generous support of the Rossy Family Foundation, and builds upon the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education in the Arts.

 

An Art Hive is based on the idea of an open studio space. It welcomes everyone as an artist, supporting them in the exploration of their creative capacity and aiming to build a stronger, more inclusive community through the process of art-making.

Come and spend some time in our newfound home learning more about what the Art Hive could mean for students, instructors and all the various student support units on campus; getting to know the artists-in-residence, and enjoying exhibitions and screenings.

 

Dr. Claudia Mitchell, Director of the IHDW

Dr. Maria Ezcurra, MAHI Art Facilitator

Ms. Sadaf Farookhi, MAHI Coordinator


Tuesday, November 28, 5-7 pm @ Education building, 3700 McTavish, 1st floor

[Click here or on the image to RSVP]

[event page]

Art Hive, 2015-2017

Starting in September 2015, the Faculty of Education began hosting McGill’s first Art Hive (http://arthives.org) facilitated by AiR Maria Ezcurra in 2015-2016 and by AiR Lori Beavis on 2016-2017. Art materials and creative guidance were available to everyone who joined in to make art. It quickly became a space for getting together and create community through the arts. It was visited by 5 to 10 people per day, achieving a total of 250 visits in 9 months, including students, faculty, staff, and some external visitors.

                 

For more pictures click here.

With the renewed priority, energy, and commitment that characterizes the Faculty of Education’s current work in the area of knowledge through the arts, the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts ensures timely and appropriate presentation of creative work in the Faculty. To this end, a small annual budget is being used to display student and researcher works in the Education building.

Starting in January 2016, the P. Lantz Fellows were invited to transform some common areas in the Education building based on what they think/feel the spaces needed. See Inhabiting Lost Spaces.

Also in January, the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts invited academics, students, and staff in the Faculty of Education to submit proposals for the Initiatives in Arts and Music Education. See New Initiatives in Arts and Music Education for a list of the selected projects.

 

Altar for the Day of the Dead -Ofrenda de Día de Muertos- To honour the lives of the children who did not return from Canada’s Indian residential schools

Altar for the Day of the Dead

– Ofrenda de Día de Muertos –

To honour the lives of the children who did not return
from Canada’s Indian residential schools

November 2nd, 2017, 2-4 pm
Entrance lobby of the Faculty of Education, 3700 McTavish Street – 1st Floor, McGill University

* Join the new McGill Art Hive Initiative on Monday, Oct. 30, from 12 to 2 pm, to make art and traditional elements for the altar *

** There will also be a special screening session of the Weekly Indigenous Film Series related to our Altar for the Day of the Dead event, on Thursday, November 2nd from 4 – 6 pm, in room EDUC 216 **

 

This altar (ofrenda) commemorates the lives of thousands of children who were taken from their homes and sent to Indian Residential schools and did not return home. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has identified 3,200 deaths in the TRC’s Register of Confirmed Deaths, while other sources estimate that 6,000 children died in the Indian Residential schools. In over one-third of these deaths the schools did not record the children’s names, in one quarter of the deaths the child’s gender was not recorded, and in over half the cases the cause of death was not recorded. Children at Residential schools died at a far higher rate than school-aged children in the general population.

Photo by: Maria Ezcurra

These findings are in keeping with statements that former students and their parents gave to the Commission. They spoke of children who went to school and never returned. The tragedy of the loss of children was compounded by the fact that burial places were distant or even unknown. Many Indigenous people have unanswered questions about what happened to their children or relatives while they were attending residential school.

The Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) is a festive and sacred time in Mexico and some other Latin American countries. This day, the souls of the dead are welcomed back, joined with the living, becoming a celebration of life. Significant objects are placed as gifts to the visiting souls in ofrendas: the altars for the children are set on the eve of October 31st with sweets, fruits and white flowers, while the eve of November 1st is the time to honour the adults. Although many elements of Catholicism were incorporated into the ofrenda after the Spanish conquest, it is considered mostly an Indigenous tradition.

As women artists we want to offer this ofrenda to the Indigenous children who never returned home – for whatever reason. Our hope is to promote awareness on this issue, creating a space for dialogue and bringing the community of McGill together.

 

Photo by: Maria Ezcurra

With this ofrenda installed at the Faculty of Education, we want to acknowledge the traditional territory of the Kanien’kehá:ka people where we stand today, celebrating our ancestors and sharing diverse Indigenous culture with the community of McGill.

Project by Maria Ezcurra, Haidee Lefebvre and Lori Beavis, supported by the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education and the Arts, Institute for Human Development and Well-being (IHDW) and the McGill Art Hive Initiative (MAHI).

Photo by: Maria Ezcurra

 

[more photos from Faculty of Education Art Initiatives and the Altar for the Day of the Dead]

Additional News & Projects

 

Launch of the new publication:

The 7th Sense!


TouVA Proudly Announces the Launch of the new publication, The 7th Sense!
TouVA est fière d’annoncer le lancement de la publication Le 7e sens !

The 7th Sense: Practicing Dialogues / Practicing Workshops / Practicing the Daily Performative / Practicing Performance Art

Comprised of essays, a glossary, as well as contributions by 30 contemporary performance artists, The 7th Sense surveys the performative in, with and through language. It explores a vocabulary as a process of naming, and of articulating what happens before, during and after a performative action; to express what is experienced by the artist who proposes a work, and by the audience who receives it.

The TouVA collective presents a series of reflections which are to be understood in relationship to their artworks, and to the workshops that Sylvie Tourangeau, Victoria Stanton and Anne Bérubé have both taken or facilitated. Three practitioners’ voices offer multiple perspectives, plural yet singular, to consider the performative as an art, or as a way of life; they delineate a kind of pathway that invites the emergence and recognition of an increased sensibility in this vibrant and fleeting performative: a 7th Sense.

ISBN 978-2-923612-54-6
$40 (special launch price: $30)
360pp
Published by SAGAMIE édition d’art and M:ST

Please read more here

Cycle 2 of the Doing Nothing project announcement

P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education and the Arts Presents:
Resting, Walking, Place-Making: The Invisible, Liminal Spaces in Art

Nothing continues!… I am THRILLED to officially announce Cycle 2 of the Doing Nothing project! Taking place over 2017-2018, Resting, Walking, Place-Making: The Invisible, Liminal Spacesin Art is being hosted through the Department of Integrated Studies in Education in the Faculty of Education at McGill University as part of their P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education and the Arts. Working alongside Aaron Richmond, we’ll be two Artists-in-Residence, on campus for the academic year.

– Read more on my blog –

– Read more on McGill University’s website –

 

Second Season of the Weekly Indigenous Film Series (September 28th to November 23rd, 2017)

The P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education and the Arts presents the Second Season of the Weekly Indigenous Film Series*, presented by former Artist-in-Residence Lori Beavis, in the Faculty of Education.

Supported by the Department of Integrated Studies in Education and the Institute for Human Development and Well-Being, the series will feature documentaries and feature films by Indigenous filmmakers.

(*) The Weekly Indigenous Film Series will run every Thursday, from September 28th to November 23rd4 – 6 pm, in room EDUC 233.

 

 

Please NOTE that the Weekly Indigenous Film Series will be launched on Tuesday, September 19th, 2 – 4 pm, in room EDUC 338. As part of the Indigenous Awareness Week, DISE’s Weekly Indigenous Film Series will be screeningFinding Dawn (2006, NFB, 73 min), by director Christine Welsh.

 

Directed by acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh, Finding Dawn is a compelling documentary that puts a human face to the national tragedy of MMIW.

There will also be a special screening session related to our Altar for the Day of the Dead event, on Thursday, November 2nd from 4 – 6 pm, in room EDUC 216.

Please see more here

 

 

List of films:

“Hunt for the Wilderpeople” (Waititi, 2016)

Nov. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

A series of short films by Wapikoni Mobile

 2 Nov. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

                                                         [EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

“Martha of the North”          (Lepage, 2009)

26 Oct. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

 

“No Turning Back”                                (Coyes, 1997)

19 Oct. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Rocks at Whiskey Trench”             (Obomsawin, 2000)

12 Oct. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

“Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance”                                             (Obomsawin, 1993)

Oct. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

[EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

 

“Mother of Many Children”             (Obomsawin, 1977)

28 Sep. 2017 – 16:00 to 18:00

                                                        [EVENT PAGE]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more: https://knowledge-through-the-arts.ca

Contact: maria.ezcurralucotti@mcgill.ca

P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence and Education in the Arts & Artist-in-Residence 2015-17 in a video

Meet DISE Artists-in-Residence 2017-18

Aaron Richmond and Victoria Stanton are our two new Artists-in-Residence working in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education.

Aaron Richmond

 

Victoria Stanton

They will be collaborating with the community of the Faculty of Education during the 2017-2018 school year, supported by the P. Lantz Initiative for Excellence in Education & the Arts and the Institute for Human Development and Well-Being (IHDW).

We’re very pleased to welcome Aaron and Victoria to the Faculty of Education.

Read more here

 

Montreal Standing with Standing Rock Project, Stencil Workshop

By Lori Beavis

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